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Wednesday, 13 July 2016

The Lighthouse

It looks tiny from across the marsh,

 

yet standing next to this lighthouse, you an appreciate its height of more than 13 meters or almost 45 feet. 

 

It is located at New London Bay, nestled behind a small sand dune on a sandy beach at the mouth of the Fox River Inlet, Prince Edward Island, Canada.

 

This lighthouse is at sea level, which I find unusual. I am familiar with lighthouses, having lived in Newfoundland until six years ago. There, the lighthouses usually stand on rocky cliffs, often many meters above sea level like this one on Twillingate Island, Newfoundland.

 
                                                       
On PEI, such is not usually the case.

The New London Lighthouse is automated, with solar panels visible on the south side of the structure. 

 

These additions are more recent as the lighthouse was built in 1876 at a cost of $1300.00. Families lived in the lower level, with the keeper tending the light in the tower.

 

The first female light keeper in Canada was at this lighthouse. Maisie Adams tended the light from 1940-1956. Her youngest child was born there. Maisie took over the job as light keeper from her husband Claude, after his death. During his illness, Maisie did the job as she raised her three children. She was a reliable, competent, island woman.

 

Today, while the lighthouse still guides mariners, it also stands as a reminder of days past, of a time when a keeper aided boats and ships by tending the light. Families were born and raised as the work continued, the women's contribution unseen behind the spotlight. This lighthouse is a testament to the dedication of those men and women whose efforts helped and saved countless mariners.



 

24 comments:

  1. Very interesting post about this lighthouse, Marie. You live in a really beautiful area and I'm learning more about it every day, from you. Thank you. :-)

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    1. It is beautiful, Jan. We love it here.

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  2. There's something about lighthouses.

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  3. As a prairie girl, lighthouses fascinate me.

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    1. Maybe the prairies need a few lighthouses just to change up the scenery a bit.

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  4. Isn't it beautiful. It almost looks like a Windmill without the sails.

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  5. Thanks for the history! I wonder if the world really understands the uncounted hours of women.

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    1. Only women really understand, I fear.

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  6. I wonder how long before they have to move that lighthouse away from the shore?

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  7. What a lovely lighthouse. I have always been fascinated by them and each has a story to tell. Thanks, Marie

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    1. So true. If those walls could talk!

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  8. Yet another of the jobs which saved countless lives. Were often largely unrewarded. Lonely. Difficult. Essential. And relied (often) on a woman behind the scenes. Who was every bit as essential as her husband/father...

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    1. A woman's work, so often under-valued and unappreciated. Is it changing? I wonder sometimes.

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  9. I enjoyed reading the history of the lighthouse. Very charming building with the white and the red window frames.

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  10. I appears so tiny from across the marsh but it is impressive when one is stood next to it.

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  11. You made an interesting observation about the fact it's built at sea level. I have never seen a lighthouse up close. It's incredible that she raised 3 children in that house. Now a days they want bigger and bigger houses. Sounds like she was an incredible woman!

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    1. I think she was incredible. Dedicated in every way!

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  12. What a wonderful tribute to the men AND women who are/were reliable "saviors" along the coastlines of our world, Marie. I have always been fascinated by lighthouses and wonder if perhaps I was one such woman in a past life?

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    1. Who knows? You may have been. Those women worked so hard!

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  13. I recall the story of Maisie taking over the lighthouse after her husband died, another blogger from the island likely shared it. Lighthouses are always a point of interest when visiting your province, their history is fascinating.

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    1. There are only three others like this one, with the living accomodations attached, left on this island now. The others are only the towers.

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