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Wednesday, 26 July 2017

Tall ships

The rigging is impressive, 




meter after meter and all with purpose. Four tall ships were in Summerside recently. Men were busy in the rigging on one of the vessels in preparation for sailing. Imagine doing that work any time, but especially in rough seas!



There were two square riggers plus a schooner and a sloop. 


These ships aren’t a regular sight in Summerside. Most of the harbour traffic here is fishing boats 




but sail boats are common in the summer.




Cargo ships are common as well, maneuvering their way around the Indian Head Lighthouse. 




The most impressive sight however, is the tall ships, even when they are not under sail.

As the vessels left the harbour, one could imagine the days when our ancestors left distant shores, looking for a better life in various parts of the New World. It wasn't too long ago when the only vessels in this harbour were powered by the wind.


The first to leave port was the Alexander von Humboldt II from Germany, the biggest of the vessels, a three masted square rigger. She had her green sails furled as she headed out through the channel.




Then the other square rigger, the Picton Castle, left the wharf. 


The schooner, the Bowdoin, had sails from one mast as she passed.





Together with the sloop, the Peter von Danzig,  these are training ships, where new generations learn the skills necessary to operate the vessels.




In the distance, the Humboldt resembles a ghost of a by-gone era.






30 comments:

  1. Such magnificent ships, Marie. Your pictures tell the story very well of different kinds of ships and how they differ. I thought of the poem that has the line "... and all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by." :-)

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    1. Steering by the stars! It had slipped my mind! Thanks for the reminder, Jan.

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  2. I love tall ships! Odd fascination for a prairie girl but perhaps it's because my ancestor who first came to the Thirteen Colonies from Britain in the early 1700s was a sea captain.

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  3. As a weaver, I look at those ships and think that from the beginning of time until the industrial revolution, all the thread for weaving those sails was spun by hand; the cloth woven on looms no more than 40" wide and sewn together. What a massive undertaking to outfit a ship!

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    1. Joanne, I will never see one of these ships again without thinking of you and the spinning and weaving you mentioned. I had never thought of the sails that way. Thank you for opening my eyes!

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  4. Really breath taking ships, there's just something majestic about them isn't it.

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  5. It's a thrilling sight Marie. We got to go on the Lady Washington when she visited Pasco, WA in 2015, it came up the Columbia River. It was build in 1989 in Aberdeen, WA on the coast. Not historical but pretty exciting anyway.

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    1. They are just the most exciting to watch, Celia!

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  6. What a diverse selection of ships passing through the area. We have a good selection up here on Lough Foyle that pass through and it's fun to see and photograph them. I'm going to post a ship tomorrow that comes from the Netherlands. Fantastic photos Marie and have a wonderful day.

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    1. Thanks, Bill. I enjoyed the photo of tall ship you posted today too.

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  7. A truly glorious sight. But oh the work, in building them, rigging them and sailing them.
    They have a romance and a beauty which I think is largely absent from modern transport, but it came at a cost.

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    1. A terrible cost in many respects too, EC.

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  8. It was lovely to see these tall ships. I am currently researching the history of the ships that were built here, many of which headed over to Newfoundland. Many years ago we had the Tall Ships Race start in Weymouth. It was a magnificent sight to see 20 ships in the harbour and very impressive to see them set sail. Sarah x

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    1. It must have been incredible to see so many tall ships together, Sarah.

      Your research sounds interesting. Will you blog about it?

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  9. These ships are marvelous. Thanks for sharing them with us.

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    1. You would take great photos of these ships, FG.

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  11. You'd never catch me in water that is more that waist deep, but I love seeing the boats and ships. These are very cool.

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  12. These are works of art, Ratty.

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  13. Who ISN'T in love with these tall ships, Marie! We had the good fortune of seeing the huge spectacle in 2010 with Sail Amsterdam. OMG! You never forget such an event. Even with "just" 4 ships, I can imagine the thrill!

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    1. It must have been incredible to see so many of these amazing ships, Ginnie. It would be unforgettable for sure.

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  14. It's nice to keep some of the past alive.

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    1. These ships are part of the heritage of many of us, AC.

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  15. Amazing!!! I love everything about this post! Gorgeous photos.

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    1. They were amazing, Angela. Thank you.

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  16. Oh I'm glad I didn't miss these beauties Marie, tall ships are incredible to see sailing in and out of harbour and you've shown them so beautifully here! The complex rigging fascinates me too, would be quite something to know what they're all used for ☺

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  17. I know. Guess my chance to find out is past now though, PDP.

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