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Friday, 9 March 2018

Burrs

There aren’t any branches or leaves. All that remains is a knotted mass of burrs on what is left of a tree. It has long since shed its youthful beauty. Unlike any other gnarled tree we have ever seen in our treks on Prince Edward Island, this one is covered in burrs. Usually there are one or two burrs. 




This tree tests imagination.




One can only imagine the stress this tree endured. Was it from fungi, bacteria, viruses, insect activity, animal activity, weather, human damage or a combination of any of these factors? Even the twigs are affected.




This tree makes me wonder how stress affects our bodies.




What are our burrs? Are they loss of sleep, lines on the face, gray hair, weight gain or loss? Are they even more insidious such as damage to blood vessels and heart from high blood pressure due to stress hormones? We each handle stress in our own way but there is potential for body damage. Unlike the burrs on this tree, most of us don’t show the stress as readily. 

Or do we?


46 comments:

  1. That tree looks like how I'm feeling this morning!

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    1. Lol. There are days I feel like that too, Debra.

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  2. Interesting question. And that poor tree is certainly suffering! I also wonder what causes such damage.

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    1. A variety of factors cause such damage, including, viruses or insects, Jan.

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  3. Wow there really are a lot of burrs (burls) on those trees, I have never seen so many!! Keep well Diane

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  4. Wow. I've never seen anything like that. Can any type of tree get a burr? Ill have to research that.

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    1. From what I’ve read, any tree can develop burrs, Barbara.

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  5. Just like Barb, above, I've never seen anything like this.

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  6. Replies
    1. It belongs in a horror film, Mage. But then again, it is a testament to survival under extreme stress.

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  7. I've never seen so many burrs on a single tree. I've heard them described as being like an oyster's pearls. And they can be valuable too; walnut burr is especially sought after to make the attractive veneer that expensive cars have on their dashboards and interiors.

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    1. Burrs are sought for woodworking. This tree may be past usefulness, John.

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  8. We called those burls. I've seen fabulous wood carvings from them; the grain is so swirled.

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    1. The wood is valuable, Joanne. It may be too late for this tree.

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  9. That tree is like a sculpture, sort of a monument to endurance.

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    1. I agree, Celia. Survival in the face of adversity.

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  10. I never seen a tree like this before.

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    1. That was my first thought too, Andrea.

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  12. Wow. That poor, poor tree.
    And yes, I suspect many of us carry similar burrs. Perhaps better hidden, but no less numerous.

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    1. I wonder if the trees senses the attacks which cause it to respond in such a way, EC.

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  13. Poor tree. I have never been good at hiding my emotions or mental state lol, if I am stressed you'll likely know. I have burrs under my eyes lol.

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    1. I have a few burrs there too, Jenn.

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  14. OMG! I have never seen a tree like that in my life, Marie! You have made of it a great metaphor and have asked pertinent questions. My immediate answer was "all of the above." But now I must add something, for which I will let you carry the metaphor on in your own way: look at all those incredibly gorgeous, artistic burr-bowls just waiting to be lathed!

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    1. Surviving the stress would make us stronger, Ginnie.

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  15. Oh my gosh! That poor tree. According to Google it's stress or insect infestation that causes burrs. You almost wish someone would put the poor thing out of it's misery and chop it down.

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    1. The tree is dead now, PDP. I imagine it will soon to the forest floor.

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  16. What an amazing tree. Those burrs are not like burls, are they? Because wood-workers like those.

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    1. Burrs and burls are the same thing, TBor.

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  17. That indeed brings up thoughts. It's similar in our bodies, cancer seems to do something just like that in the tree. I agree with a previous comment and wish nature would take it out of it's misery.

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    1. These burrs are sought by woodworkers, Angela, though I suspect this tree is dead.

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  18. I have never seen a tree like that. Your island is full of surprises. As for stress... they call it the killer disease. I wonder what word did people use before Hans Seyle defined stress in 1936. How did they explain the feeling we caLl stress. Preoccupation? Nervousness? I am going to look into it. Now I am curious. People were living at a slower pace... We should attempt that on a daily basis. :)

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    1. Slowing down would help today, Catarina. Being available all of the time, via cell phone, doesn’t help us at all.

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  19. so interesting and awesome examples through pictures!!!

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  20. It's so true that stress can be a silent killer. However, I've seen some beautiful sculptures and bowls made from those burrs.

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    1. I’ve seen a few too, Kay. Gorgeous.

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  21. People show their stresses all the time.
    And they even smell of it at other times.
    Love the tree. Love, trees. LOVE THEM!

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    1. Love them too, HW, in all their seasonal beauty.

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  22. A great analogy, Marie. I've seen burrs/burls on trees before but never to such an extent. And thank you for using the word burr instead - it made me look it up and apparently we use the American version (burl) instead of the British, which is unusual in NS! hah

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    1. I’m more inclined to use the British, though not for everything.

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