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Friday, 25 March 2016

Through the Spans

The Confederation Bridge which connects Prince Edward Island to mainland Canada is 12.9 kilometers or 8 miles long. It is the longest bridge in the world over ice covered waters. Last week, my husband, Rick and I went to Borden-Carleton to take some pictures of the bridge. These pictures of the ice around the bridge are the first in a series of pictures we took that day.

The ice in the Northumberland Strait has broken up and only remnants remained along the shoreline. The shapes of the ice were interesting as well as the view through the spans of the bridge.



New Brunswick is visible in the distance.


This fixed link with New Brunswick, Canada, replaced two ferries, one of which operated from this location in Prince County, on the western end of the island. Rocks deposited along the coastline prevent erosion.


The red soil of the island is visible along the shoreline and in the ice itself.



The bridge was constructed between 1993 and 1997. It changed the lives of islanders by eliminating their dependency on the ferries.



High winds cause closure of the bridge on occasion though such conditions do not continue for long periods. 



The bridge means transportation of goods and people between the island and the mainland is quick and efficient  



and the ice does not impede the movement of traffic.



The day was cold and the wind made it uncomfortable but the scene was worth the numbing cold. 




26 comments:

  1. We LOVED driving on the Confederation Bridge when we were there! When we left PEI, we did so by ferry over to Pictou, NB.

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    1. One ferry from the east county runs for the tourist season every year until late fall. It isn't a year round operation any more.

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  2. I never thought I would see these ice floes, but because of your blog, now I have. Very interesting and rather beautiful. It sure does look cold, though. :-)

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    1. It was a numbing cold that day but beautiful.

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  3. I like these images of ice. We never get such sights here.

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    1. I love the look of it too, Adrian.

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  4. Looks so cold! Marie!
    I had known and seen the bridge on a map, but I did not think the bridge was such long!!

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    1. It is a beautiful sight but so cold that day.

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  5. Such a beautiful place!! Great photos. Wishing you a happy Easter!

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    1. Happy Easter, Angela, from the cold, icy northeast.

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  6. I image the drive across the bridge has exciting vistas. I can only image engineering involved in such a long span over dangerous waters.

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  7. It's so good to read about the history of the bridge and how long it is! You must have been cold that day taking photos, but I'm glad you did, lovely to see them.

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    1. I can imagine the art you would do in this area, Ann.

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  8. I had no clue, Marie...especially that it's the LONGEST bridge in the world over water. Absolutely wonderful images of a site/sight to behold! I've been to PEI but not to the part where the bridge is.

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    1. You missed our part of PEI, Ginnie. You'll have to come back.

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  9. Amazing pictures Marie. It makes me shiver when I see those ice floes ! Thanks for always taking us on these great pictorial journeys.

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    1. I love photos of the bridge. I have to go back when it's warmer.

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  10. It bothers some people to drive that long bridge, but it didn't bother me. We entered via bridge and exited via ferry. It costs a lot to leave PEI. :)

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    1. You pay when you are leaving. The ferry is more expensive than the bridge by half.

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  11. The bridge must have made such a difference to the islanders life. Did the ferries stop completely during the winter? We were complaining earlier in the week that it was freezing here but it probably would have felt warm to you. Thank you for bearing the cold and sharing these wonderful images with us. Sarah x

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    1. The ferry didn't stop in later years as ice breakers helped out. Now the remaining ferry stops in late fall.

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  12. Looking at these cold photos helps me understand why my ancestors left Canada for warmer places like Maine, New Hampshire and Wisconsin.

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  13. It is much colder here than there for sure. It was bitterly cold the day I took those photos.

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  14. For me, living in Texas, that sight is unbelievable. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. I cannot imagine a life without snow and ice, Barbara. You are welcome.

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