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Monday, 20 June 2016

Hip-Yer-Partner

My home province of Newfoundland has a rich culture. The early settlers, mainly from England and Ireland, brought their culture and traditions with them. The isolation of the island and the further isolation of the outport villages stretched along the coast, meant the exposure to other cultures and traditions was limited. People kept their family heritage alive through their stories, music and songs. 

The influence of Irish and English culture is certainly evident in the music, as old songs and jigs from the homelands have survived. However, creative people composed their own lyrics and music, many passed on through the oral tradition.

Today in Prince Edward Island, our granddaughters love to dance any time they visit and I usually sing Newfoundland songs for them. When I switch to another song, they ask for the Newfoundland songs again. Their favourite is a traditional song called I'se da B'y, which means I'm the boy in Newfinese. The girls call it Hip-Yer-Partner, which is part of the chorus. I expect before long they will be singing the song themselves.

 

Below is a version of the song by Great Big Sea, a group of Newfoundland musicians. The words are included. It is a toe-tapper and I usually clap along with it too. Enjoy!

18 comments:

  1. Loved it! I can see why the little ones like the music, I did too. :-)

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  2. Your granddaughters are so fortunate to have someone who will sing such a lively and interesting song with them. My favorite kind of music!

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    1. I love this music and want the girls to know about their Newfoundland heritage.

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  3. That is so cute. I love the old English and Irish music.

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    1. Me too. Such a rich musical tradition.

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  4. I learned that song as a kid from watching the old CBC program of Newfoundland music called "All Around the Circle," the name of which came from that song too, of course. When I read Alan Doyle's autobiography, I learned that some of his relatives were musicians on that show.

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    1. Yes they were. I loved his book. He's working on the Great Big Sea part now.

      My grandmother was also from Petty Harbour and I knew exactly what Alan wrote about in his book.

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  5. Your grand daughters must enjoy dancing to that tune! It is good that the traditional songs have not been lost. I have been reading over the weekend about how salt brought in from Portugal was stored here before the fishermen left to fish in Newfoundland waters. Sarah x

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    1. Thank you for sharing the information about the salt. I must research it.

      The old songs have been saved through the hard work of a group of Newfoundland musicians.

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  6. Hoppy, boppy - and fun. Which there needs to be more of.
    Thank you.

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    1. It is fun for the girls and for me.

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  7. Wonderful...and wonderful to have those visitors too. :)

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  8. I remember singing that song in elementary school in Montreal in the 50s and am also a fan of GBS.

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    1. It is one of the best known Newfoundland songs!

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  9. The Scots settled in the highlands of western NC where I spent much of my youth. We learned all the old songs in school and also how to play a zither. I think June Carter Cash, from that area (Appalachia) played a zither.

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    1. The musical heritage of Appalachia is wonderful.

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