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Monday, 10 September 2018

A different sort of fish

Looking out the window of Doucet House in Rustico, the oldest house on Prince Edward Island, the land and sea stretch before you. Farming was a big part of the lives of the Acadians but so was fishing. The same is true today for this gentle island.





The bay shows signs of three fisheries, oyster, mussel and eel, among the many on the island. 





The latter is unfamiliar to me and caught my interest. 





There is an active eel fishery in Prince Edward Island and in Rustico you can see where the traps are in the water. Traps are the shape of a windsock, with an opening on the larger end. The season runs from  August to October, with a size limit on the fish which can be kept.

The serpentine like fish are not commonly eaten in Canada but there is a market overseas so the product is exported. For example, marinated eel is an antipasto in Italy.


This is a recipe for whole roasted eel. The description of its preparation is unlike anything I’ve ever seen.


Roasted eel


I have never eaten eel nor seen it to buy. I am curious about it and would probably try it. How about you?















35 comments:

Anvilcloud said...

I'm glad to read your post, but ... um ... WRT your question. :)

Debra She Who Seeks said...

I have never, ever eaten eel and have absolutely no desire to do so!

Celia said...

Interesting, but I think I will pass on the eel dining.

DJan said...

Um... no, I don't think I would eat eel. I think I once tasted it when in China on a trip to Shanghai. It was on one of those rotating turntables, and I asked what it was and tasted it cautiously. It was only because I knew what it was that I didn't have more. :-)

Debbie said...

such a pretty view outside the window. i have never eaten eel and i guess i would. for whatever reason, i think it would be rubbery. i don't like calamari!!

William Kendall said...

Beautiful shots!

I have an aversion to seafood in general, so I would not.

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Oh no! Not for me Marie but then again I am pitifully unadventurous when it comes to food.. oh la, the video didn't help 😀😀

Elephant's Child said...

Beautiful scenes. And of course fishing was important. However, reading that article this vegetarian is very, very grateful her food doesn't wriggle.

bill said...

An eel fishery, I never knew one existed. I love fish but never tried eel and most likely never will. It just doesn't look very apertizing.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

Freshwater eels used to be caught and eaten a lot around here but recently the population has collapsed. Funny how so many people who've never tasted eel are convinced that they don't like it. It's actually quite tasty.

Joanne Noragon said...

I think eel is (was) a common food in Ireland. No experience myself. Your photography is as wonderful as ever!

Barbara said...

Haha. I don't think I'm going to test out that recipe.

PerthDailyPhoto said...

P.s. your first image is gorgeous 💙

Danielle L Zecher said...

The only time I've seen eel available as an option is in Japanese restaurants; unagi, I think. I've never tried it, and don't think I will. Slithery things weird me out, so I don't think I could bring myself to try it.

Tabor said...

I have eaten eel. Not something I owuld write home about. Eel is popular in Asia and farm-raised there.

jenny_o said...

Long answer: I know that eels can't help how they look or move, and I know that some of us (me!) eat what we grew up eating and not much else will pass our lips, but I still can't make my stomach or my gag reflex stop doing what they do if I think about eating some things :D

Short answer: no. I salute you for being willing to try it.

Marie Smith said...

Lol. It’s just a fish, AC.

Marie Smith said...

Lol. It seems many people feel the same way, Debra.

Marie Smith said...

A common response, Celia.

Marie Smith said...

The thought of eel appears to be a deterrent to eating it, Jan.

Marie Smith said...

I believe it is a white fish texture, Debbie, from what I can determine.

Marie Smith said...

You miss out on a lot of great food, William. At least from my perspective..

Marie Smith said...

I wouldn’t want to be the one to kill the eel, Grace.

Marie Smith said...

Lol. I know what you mean, EC.

Marie Smith said...

I think the snake-like look of eel is a big deterrent, Bill.

Marie Smith said...

The look of it puts people off I think, John.

Marie Smith said...

Thank you, Joanne.

Marie Smith said...

I wouldn’t want to be the cook but I’d taste it for sure, Barbara.

Marie Smith said...

Thanks, Grace.

Marie Smith said...

The snake-like nature of eel puts people off, Danielle.

Marie Smith said...

The farm raised part and not the eel itself would put me off, Tabor.

Marie Smith said...

I hear you, Jenny. I understand the gag reflex for sure. Live bugs in central Australia was a limit for me!p

Catarina said...

Definitely not! Just the thought of it... : ))

There is a traditional and very famous Portuguese dish - Eel stew - specially in the north that people just love. I really don't understand why!!!

I am from the south!! : )) You can imagine what eels remind me of...

Secondary Roads said...

Eel is available at what is for me a newly found Korean restaurant. I've eaten strange things and have been seldom disappointed. I'll let you know more after I've tried it. That is if I try a double check on the website and I see the cost is twice what other choices are.

Secondary Roads said...

I checked the recipe and read that the taste is between fish and alligator. Sounds perfectly delicious to me. The question is, Is a plate of eel over rice worth $20 US?