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Friday, 7 October 2016

After the harvest

Last week, farmers harvested the potato fields in our area of Prince Edward Island and sure enough, the geese found those fields. The Canada geese feed and rest in the open fields this time of year. This location provided an opportunity for me to get nearer to them for pictures, but they were wary.

We parked the car and I stayed there watching and shooting as they fed and rested at the end of the field. 

 

I walked slowly forward and continued to shoot, stopped for a time and moved forward again. They were watching. 

 

As I moved nearer the field, the geese walked further into the field, slowly, stopping when I did. There was a certain distance between us which was comfortable for them. 

 

If I came any closer, they moved to that distance again. However, they didn't feel threatened enough to fly away. The part of the flock which was further away from me to begin with, did not move. 

 

We had never seen geese in Newfoundland and Labrador though they are part-time residents in areas of the province. When we moved to Prince Edward Island, we were enthralled with their V formation, sound, appearance and habits. Walking along the boardwalk by the bay one day, we stopped to watch and listen. Another walker stopped and said, "Bet you wish you had a gun handy!" We were shocked.

Of course some islanders hunt geese. This time of year, with Thanksgiving on the horizon, the blinds are up in the fields as hunters pursue that Thanksgiving goose. While we are accustomed to hunting for food as a way of life, we hadn't thought of the geese that way. The shooting we do is more goose friendly.

Before long, Canada geese will be gone for another year, south to our American neighbours. Some have caused havoc there. Scientists determined the geese which caused Captain Sullenberger to land the plane in the Hudson River were from Labrador. Those feathered creatures we love so much can be a threat to life and limb when it comes to other fliers. 

 

We love them anyway.

14 comments:

  1. It amazes me that some people only see other creatures as something to exploit or eat. I love the pictures you got as you "shot" your geese. :-)

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    1. It was amazing to watch them keep me at a safe distance, Jan.

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  2. Hello Marie.
    Love to see those geese found the field after farmers harvested.
    I agree with you. They are beautiful and friendly birds. It is a sad to see some of them are shot.
    However, we have fed many living creatures as a way of life. There might be no difference.
    Hope they will have a safe travel to the South.
    Have a good weekend.

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    1. We didn't see the geese as food, but many people do. Such incredible creatures!

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  3. We have so many geese in our area on account of the inland lake the community borders and unfortunately they are very messy with droppings. Many mornings when walking the dog they fly overhead in formation honking away and I am amazed by them each time.

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    1. I can imagine the mess from such large birds. I would not be too thrilled to have them in the back yard!

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  4. Like DJan, I am always amazed (and appalled) at how many people view the world as 'all about us'. I would be fascinated to see them. Thank you.

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    1. EC, I watched a huge flock of them today fly down to the bay. There were hundreds of them in various V formations, honking up a storm. They stop me in my tracks all the time.

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  5. They are so tame now. And to think, eighty years ago they were almost extinct.

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  6. Heard two big skeins of geese flying overhead tonight. Unfortunately we've got a few of those confused geese that think they should stay around all year. I much prefer the migratory ones!

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  7. Here they are the harbingers of spring and fall. I have never seen any during the winter. They are snowbirds when they need to be!

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