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Friday, 26 August 2016

Side by side

We live in seafood paradise on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Haddock, halibut, mussels, oysters, lobster, scallops, crab, and more are available in season and beyond. There are fish markets all around the island which carry mostly fresh inventory, all of which we have enjoyed. Cod, our favourite white fish, is usually available, though often brought from Nova Scotia.

 
                                                         Meal of cod and photo by Aunt M. Smith

With many of my forefathers having had a history in the fishery in Newfoundland, I always enjoy the sight of the fishing boats in the harbours around this island. Though many of these boats look different from the boats I remember, they are reminiscent of home. During a recent visit to Cabot Park along the north coast, we watched the boats go by in the channel on their way to and from Darnley Basin, their port. People relaxed along the beach and in the water at low tide, oblivious to the marine activity.

 
 
One boat looked like it had tourists out for a cruise on the bay, as beach-goers walked on the sand bars. It was a setting representative of the island.

 
 

Many of the boats have black buoys on the deck. 

 

They are from the mussel fishery, as socks, long mesh bags of mussels, are kept floating in the ocean by the buoys attached to the supporting line at the surface. Harvesting of the lines of mussels means the buoys are brought ashore, where they are stored.


The fishers hoist the lines of mussels out of the water via a winch located in the center of the deck. 

 

They remove the mussels from the socks on deck and in port, deliver them to the fish plant across from the wharf.

 

The day we were at Darnley Basin, a transport truck left the plant with fresh mussels for markets around Canada and beyond. 

 
                   Bird's eye view of Cabot Beach with Darnley Basin left of center, photo by B. Noall

The mussels are available year round, though production is reduced in the summer when the animals are spawning. The fishing industry makes Darnley Basin a busy place, while locals and tourists relax on Cabot Beach on the other side of the sand dunes. Work and relaxation exist side by side on this gentle island.

 

Thank you to Aunt M. Smith and B. Noall for the photos.

27 comments:

  1. Really interesting to learn about mussel fishing. I've got that song going through my head now about Molly Malone and her song about cockles and mussels, alive alive-O! :-)

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    1. Love that song! Thanks for the reminder!

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  2. Not a seafood fancier myself. Not even a big fish eater. But I DO love a nice bit of pan-fried haddock. Yum yum!

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    1. Haddock is good but cod is better, says the Newfoundlander! Lol.

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  3. I love the Maine coast and all the fishing. I love fish!

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    1. It is delicious! Chowders and au gratins especially.

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  4. I love seafood!!! I am asking God how come I wasn't born to live by the sea. :) Very pretty photos!!

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    1. Thank you. Life by the sea is wonderful!

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  5. What a great place to live, and your pictures, wow, I can smell the salt air. I lived in what was a fishing village as a small child (now its a tourist trap sadly) and sometimes I dream about it.

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    1. I can understand the dreams of the sea. It seeps into your soul somehow.

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  6. Gorgeous day....
    I learn a lot from my blogging friends.
    (And I love seafood!)

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    1. Seafood is so good. I love all of it too.

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  7. Interesting. I haven't watch the video yet but I'll get back to you shortly.

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  8. What a beautiful, beautiful place. To live, to work, to relax...

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    1. We are lucky to live here for sure!

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  9. The past is still charmingly with us.

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  10. Wonderful photos. Now I am craving cod. We've been told around here the stocks of cod are depleted and we should eat something else. But now I wonder.

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    1. Cod is finally back in the waters around Newfoundland. It is delicious!

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  11. nice food and pics are very live and interesting best wishes

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  12. Thank you for visiting, baili.

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  13. I have recently been reading so much about the fishermen who left these shores to fish in Newfoundland, it is wonderful to read about the current day fishing as it brings it altogether. Sarah x

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    1. Some things have not changed despite technology, such as the seasons for certain species.

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  14. Love to have some of that seafood!

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