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Wednesday, 31 August 2016

Rusty sneakers

The soil is thick and rich, red with few rocks. The iron in the soil oxidizes or rusts, causing the red colour which stains white socks and other clothes if you are not careful. In one way, sneakers rust with use on Prince Edward Island.

There are beautiful beaches, which when crowded by island standards, are not crowded like beaches elsewhere. We have visited those beaches numerous times this summer and observed the sandstone shoreline from a distance 

 

and up close. 

 

The sandstone is easily eroded by the sea, 

 

creating more red sand, the accumulation of which can become more sandstone over time.

 

The natural cycle of nature is at work with each wave.

 

The wonder of this place is a backdrop for life with family and friends. Rusty sneakers are a small price to pay for the pleasure afforded by life on the gentle island.

 

28 comments:

  1. It is a beautiful place. I'm glad I've begun to learn so much about it from you. I look forward to learning more. :-)

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    1. I love this island for family here but for the island itself as well. I guess that's why I write about it so much.

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  2. At first I misread your blog post title as "Busty sneakers." Oh oh!

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  3. An excellent title for your piece, and a beautiful place to spend time.

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    1. I have to buy sneakers regularly to replace the rusty ones.

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  4. Beautiful. I recall as a child traveling up to the northernmost part of Wisconsin along Lake Superior. The ground was red, red, red from iron ore, Dad said. Now I am wondering if the great Niagra escarpment which reaches from New York to Wisconsin is sandstone. And how about our Red River, or the Colorado?

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    1. The escarpment is limestone over shale. The shale is sedimentary rock, as is sandstone but they are different in their components. I don't know about the Red or Colorado Rivers.

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  5. Anne's land.
    I did swim n the ocean (my one and only time) at Stanhope.

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    1. I've never been to Stanhope but it is on our list of places to visit.

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  6. Definitely a small price. And well worth paying. What a glorious place.

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  7. Rusty sneakers, a small price to pay.

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    1. Very inexpensive and good value for the beauty!

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  8. Such a gorgeous little island.

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    1. It is such a little island, Barbara.

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  9. I would gladly trade rusty red sneakers for a chance to get to your beautiful island. It looks like paradise to me !

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    1. It is beautiful, in spring, summer and autumn. Then we have eastern Canadian winter.

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  10. Sounds like your little island is being eaten by the sea-monster. If I were you I would move further inland. Lovely pictures.

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    1. It's on our minds for sure, Keith. The erosion is evident, that's for sure.

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  11. Rusty sneakers! I never would have thought of that but I'm sure that's the perfect description of what happens there in your neck of the woods, Marie. Yes, a small price to pay because it really IS beautiful!

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  12. Those PEI beaches are amazing, beautiful but not crowded. We walked for miles on our past visits.

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  13. Beautiful, Devon has red rocks and soil that used to find fascinating as a child. It must have felt familiar to the Devon fishermen when they reached your shores. Is the erosion gradual or do you have rock falls? Sarah x

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  14. We have both gradual erosion and rock falls here. I took some photos to show the same just yesterday. I will post them later this week.

    Some of my ancestors were from Devon. They went to the northeast coast of Newfoundland, where there was no red sandstone, unlike PEI.

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