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Friday, 12 August 2016

For the Love of Bees

There is a u-pick orchard in Prince County, Prince Edward Island which we visit every September and October. 

 

The orchard has pears, apples and plums. Two years ago, plums did not grow because there were not enough bees to pollinate the blossoms. It was a shock to see the many trees devoid of fruit.

There is concern world-wide for bees. Mites have decimated the hives; pesticides and insecticides have done the rest. Our food supply depends on bees for pollination and we cannot survive without them. The lack of plums was a shock but the disaster that could be on the horizon became real for us.

Here in Prince Edward Island, we are encouraged to plant a bee-friendly garden. One plant which attracts many of the pollinators is this musk rose bush. 

 

The bees love it and at any time, multiple bees are visiting, collecting pollen and nectar.

 

A variety of blooms throughout the summer makes for a constant buzz outside the house. Even the lawn, which is not sprayed with herbicides or pesticides, is attractive to the insects; they especially love the dandelion. We are doing our part to bee friendly.

 

16 comments:

  1. They quite like our salvia earlier in the season and our agastache now.

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    1. They have many favourites which is lucky for us.

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  2. Insecticides do most damage. The mite attacks the hives of honeybees, a European imported bee. We have dozens of other species of pollinating insects and bees that don't live in hives. If their numbers have decreased, I suspect insecticides are to blame.

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    1. Our city still allows spraying on home lawns. I wish this wasn't so.

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  3. I so hope we aren't realising their importance too late. And our garden is definitely bee friendly.

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    1. I love to see and hear them...I hope it's not too late.

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  4. Yes, without bees we're all screwed, no doubt about it.

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  5. Our community garden has plenty of bees. There are a few beekeepers nearby, and I guess that's one reason we seem to have so many varieties: bumblebees and the regular ones, mostly. Love the sound of their buzzing. :-)

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    1. I love seeing then at a safe distance.

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  6. I am glad that people seems to be aware of the importance of bees! Such nice dark red apples you there in the photo!

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    1. The apples are always beautiful in that orchard. I hope bees are a priority for all gardeners.

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  7. Yes, the lack of bees is presenting big problems. I hope the scientists can find out what is causing that and I'm glad you were able to get plum again this year ... they look luscious.

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  8. That's a picture of apples from last year, Ginnie! I hope the plums are growing this year!

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  9. The u pick orchard sounds a lovely idea. We have a community orchard here with about 60 apple trees many unusual varieties. The apples mainly get made into juice which is sold to offset the running costs. We also have a bee friendly garden, the humming of the bees is the sound of summer. We must do all we can to nurture them. Sarah x

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    1. If each does her part, the problem is solved.

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