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Wednesday, 4 October 2017

It's the season

They are easy to ignore as mere blobs on the forest floor. 




But, my husband and I have begun to look for them, not as food, as many are doing this time of year, but to capture their variety and beauty 




amid the detritus, or on the trunk of a tree.




Mushrooms are varied, in size, colour, 




shape 





and preferred substrate, to name a few of their unique characteristics. All are fungi, decomposers who help break down organic matter. They are especially prominent on the forest floor late summer and early fall.





Foragers are busy these days in search of their favourite mushrooms. Not us, though some of the mushrooms we saw were edible, or so we thought. However, not being experienced mushroom hunters, we can’t be certain about the level of danger afforded by each type we encountered.





One of our friends, who has picked wild mushrooms said, “Keep a sample in your pocket of the type of mushroom you’ve eaten. That way, if you go to or are taken to an Emergency Room, staff will know what you’ve consumed.”


However, we won’t be eating wild mushrooms any time soon although there may be a few more photos in our future.




28 comments:

  1. I would never eat wild mushrooms either. It's like playing russian roulette.

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  2. The husband of a friend of mine loves to go mushroom picking. I have seen some quite interesting types of mushrooms that he has picked. Chanterelles is the only name I remember at the moment.
    : )

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    1. Chanterelles are highly sought after I believe, Catarina.

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  3. Great pictures of mushrooms. I don't eat any I see out on the trail, either. They are picturesque and since some of them are toxic, why not just shoot them with your camera? :-)

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    1. I agree. So much safer with the camera, Jan.

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  4. They are so lovely. I love mushrooms but can't bring myself to try wild ones either.

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    1. I don't think I'd try the wild ones under any circumstances, Celia.

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  5. i agree that they are beautiful!! there is such a nice variety this time of year and they look so pretty in pictures!!!

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    1. Some of the warnings for some of them are scary, Debbie.

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  6. I shall be out looking for some next week but only to photograph. The only ones I know that are safe to eat come from the supermarket.

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  7. How many, many kinds of fungi out there. Even if I knew one from another, I think the return (the final volume) not worth the effort. Except digitally.

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  8. They are often incredibly beautiful. And some are equally deadly. Most years we lose someone here to Death Cap Mushrooms. I believe it is a truly unpleasant death.

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    1. I would like to avoid "death by mushroom " on my death certificate, EC.

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  9. I don't eat wild mushrooms but I have photographed many.

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  10. great photos! I have enough trouble digesting safe mushrooms (although I love them); I would never attempt a wild one.

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  11. Some look so beautiful. I don't eat though.

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    1. It's wise to play it safe where mushrooms are concerned, Nasreen.

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  12. Fabulous photogenic fungi! Why do I always think of fairies and elves when I see mushrooms Marie ☺

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    1. I hope the fairies and elves stay safe around the mushrooms, PDP.

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  13. I'm in your camp, Marie, wanting to look and take photos of them...but not being willing (yet) to eat them. I have a sister in Michigan who always hunts for the morels when they're in season. Perhaps I would do that if they were available here? In the meantime, your fabulous images make me want to go hunting for similar photos here.

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    1. There are so many mushrooms right now, Ginnie, before the frost.

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