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Monday, 26 June 2017

Planted

The rows are straight and look like they continue for kilometers over the rolling hills. 


 


They hold rows of potato seed or other crops in rotation. Though nothing is growing yet, 


 


the planting is completed. 


 


A Global Positioning System or GPS helps take the guess work out of plowing and planting these days, as it is easier to keep the rows straight. Now, industrialized farming uses a satellite.


 



The days of horses and the plow are long gone. Less was planted in those days and the rows were not as straight. The work was labour intensive too. These days, expensive machinery takes the place of farm hands, horse and plow.


Red soil is expecting as it always is this time of year, nurturing seeds which will grow into crops harvested this autumn. The barns are symbols of the history of the industry, as they stand watch over their domains, the fertile red fields. Some things don't change.


 

36 comments:

  1. When I saw the first photo with all those mounds I said to myself- looks like someone has been planting spuds lol
    Yes the ground is 'expecting'


    Cathy @ Still Waters

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    1. It looks like spuds to me too, Cathy.

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  2. Those pictures show the difference between your seasons and ours really well! We have very few bare fields left, just where it was too wet for farmers to get a crop in. Most crops are up about a foot now. Are potatoes really frost sensitive and get planted late? And now I'm caught up!

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    1. We had a wet spring. Planting is usually done by May 30th but it was too wet this year. It made for aa slow start for the season. Some areas are further along than this one.

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  3. Industrial farming has sure changed the way things are done. Nice straight rows, that's important! :-)

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    1. The long rolling fields, in rows are something to see, Jan.

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  4. I like the look of all those straight rows of planting, and given a couple of warm weeks and some rainy days, the crops will be appearing very soon.

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    1. Some fields are further ahead than these are, Shammickite.

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    1. These were just turned and planted, Joanne. Soraying will begin soon enough however.

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  6. That soil is very red. I look forward to the neat and tidy rows of green. Although, this type of till gardening is becoming less promoted due to the damage it does to soil structure and soil chemistry.

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    1. There are a number of soil conservation measures in place here, Tabor. I don't know where things stand with till farming however.

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  7. There's something very comforting about freshly plowed fields! Wonderfully shown here Marie, that red earth looks very familiar to me here in Australia 😊

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    1. We visited Australia years ago. Alice Springs was red like this island as I recall, PDP. We loved it.

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  8. Soon there'll be "spuds from the bright red mud"!

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    1. Rollin' down the highway smilin', Debra.

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  9. There is something almost hypnotic about those straight lines disappearing over the hils.
    And something exciting when the first green tinges appear.

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    1. The new green growth in the fields is always welcome, EC.

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  10. Those fields are ready to go to work and do their thing and the fresh food will be rewarding.

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    1. Spuds are a big industry here, Bill.

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  11. Very nice photos and it will be interesting to see the same photos in fall.

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    1. I plan o take more photos later, Mildred.

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  12. Wow, Pretty sophistocated GPS farming ... makes me wonder if the crops will taste the same? That red soil looks very fertile too.

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    1. There are so many new varieties of potatoes now, Ginnie, it would be hard to compare them to the old varieties.

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  13. These pictures and your story make me feel right at home. This is just like what it looks like around here, even the hills.

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  14. Your area is beautiful too, Ratty!

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  15. now to hope for a good growing season and harvest. It's so rainy around here that I don't know how the crops will do.

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  16. The rainy weather delayed the planting here, AC.

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  17. beautiful land, gorgeous old time barns - great images!!

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  18. Oh how I miss seeing the sight of the freshly tilled rows and rows of farmland! The soil of PEI is so accomodating to potatoes because of the lack of rock in the soil, it is amazing. My potatoes are already almost knee-high here. But I'm sure the PEI potatoes will outdo mine before long, that PEI soil is amazing. Do show pictures again in the fall before harvest, it would be nice to see how big the crops get :)

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    1. I will take more photos there, Marilyn.

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  19. How exciting to see new potato plants come out! Beautiful farmland!
    I returned from Tokyo.

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    1. It is amazing soil for potatoes, Tomoko. Welcome back.

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