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Wednesday, 29 September 2021

The Argyle Shore

The Argyle Shore on the south coast of Prince Edward Island is an area we visit several times every year. A national park and provincial parks in the area are well worth visits in the autumn. Besides, we always purchase honey at a farm along the shore at Canoe Cove and it was time to stock up.





At Canoe Cove, it is high tide and there isn’t much beach left to walk. However we walked around the park and had a great view of the cliffs.





It was obvious nearby cottagers aren’t getting down to sea level any time soon.





The sea has been busy making a hole in this cliff 





while the Bank Swallows have abandoned the holes they made in the soil above. They may have to excavate new homes next spring if erosion destroys this area. That’s a tough chore for birds tired from their spring migration.





We continued along the Argyle Shore to Skmaqn/Port la Joye/Fort Amherst, a National historic site held by the Mi’kmaq, French and English over the centuries. We always have our picnic near the wigwam in the shade of the maple trees.





Autumn colour sometimes begins with a single leaf.





An opening through the trees 





allows a close-up of the RV Maria S Merian, a German ocean research vessel in port in Charlottetown.





Two red chairs down by the water are empty and invite us to sit and relax for a few minutes. 





The spires of St. Dunstan’s Church are prominent in the skyline of Charlottetown across the harbour. 





The Front and Rear Range Lights which helped navigation for so long continue to stand vigil.





An abundance of mushrooms line a trail through the area. Some people pick wild mushrooms although my husband and I have never done so. However, some of the fungi remind us of hamburger buns. 





Hmmm… hamburgers…


You never know what will come from an outing on the island.




32 comments:

Debra She Who Seeks said...

A very picturesque spot near that wigwam!

DJan said...

Such a beautiful place. I enjoyed following your footsteps through the lovely pictures. Thank you!

The Padre said...

Completely Agree, You Just Never Know What Will Come From An Island Outing - Its Always Terrific And Inspiring - Be Well My Friends

Cheers

Beside a babbling brook... said...

How long will those cottages, last??????????

🍁🍁🍁

Elephant's Child said...

As always I really, really enjoyed travelling with you. Thank you.

bill said...

A wonderful island outing with some spectacular views. Have a great day!

Anvilcloud said...

St Dunstans looks intriguing.

margi said...

A very beautiful walk! I’m a little curious, what are wigwams uses for?

Marie Smith said...

Beside a babbling Brook,

With the rate of erosions along our coastline these days, I would be very nervous about the disappearing coastline by my cottage. They have a few years yet possibly!

Marie

Marie Smith said...

Margi,

Wigwams were the dwellings made of birch bark and used by the Indigenous people of this land.

Marie

Rose said...

What a wonderful day this must have been...I can almost feel the atmosphere from your photos. Those church spires are wonderful/amazing. I always wish I could see things like this being built.

Rose said...

I just had to google that church and go to images...oh, my, and I have only glanced.

John's Island said...

Hi Marie, Another excellent post. I do have a question, if you have time for a reply. Canoe Cove Honey … Is that a place where you take the honey and leave the money? :-) I mean, the honor system? If so, this is another reason I would love living on PEI. Next, an observation. Skmaqn/Port la Joye/Fort Amherst (now that did require some concentration while typing) … the wigwam in the shade of the maple trees … if that was in Seattle, in one of our parks, it would be occupied with the homeless. I’m going to guess there is no homeless problem on PEI. In any event, that is a neat photo. Next, love the photo of St. Dunstan’s Basilica across the harbour! That photo sent me into my archive to look again at the shots I took of the Basilica when I visited Charlottetown. Turns out it was on September 25, 2019 … almost exactly two years ago. Wow, that church building amazed me. Lastly, how did I do on my guess about the geese in your last post? Best regards to you from Seattle! John

Marie Smith said...


John,

Canoe Cove honey is on the honour system. There are numerous places here who use the honour system. We rarely hear of problems.

We have homeless on the island. The province has rented motel rooms in recent years in an effort to house everyone. The Salvation Army runs a shelter and people couch surf. There is a housing shortage on the island but I have never seen people staying in the wigwams.

I am posting about the geese photo on Friday!

Marie

Joanne Noragon said...

We had such a mushroom recently. I thought it was a red ball. Everyone laughed.

Ruth Hiebert said...

What a great set of photos. I really like the.one with the church steeples.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

If erosion continues they may find themselves down on the beach very soon! Love that wigwam. We hired one at the school where I worked (allegedly for educational purposes), it was amazingly snug and comfortable inside.

Helen said...

What a beautiful day and outing. I was thinking that you hadn't stopped to look for seals Rice Point. I then realised it was high tide. I love that view across to Charlottetown.

David M. Gascoigne, said...

Thanks for the tour, Marie. More reasons to return to the Island.

eileeninmd said...

Hello Marie,
Wonderful view and tour of the island. We try to buy the local honey, it is sold out fast. Take care, enjoy your day!

Salty Pumpkin Studio said...

The mushroom does look like a bun. Beautiful views. The chairs give the scenery another dimension.

Rhodesia said...

It is very beautiful around you but I wonder how long it will be before those cottages end up in the sea! Bet that honey is yummy. Take care, Diane

John's Island said...

Marie, thank you for the reply! Re the homeless ... It is interesting to learn that the Province has rented motel rooms to house those in need. Seattle is in King County, Washington. Our County is trying to do the same. They have even purchased some motels. There has been a homeless problem in Seattle for several years, but it has really gotten much worse during the pandemic. We are electing a new Mayor this fall and homelessness is the number one issue. Thanks again and I'm looking forward to your Friday post! :-) John

Margaret said...

What beautiful photos! I agree that you never know what you'll encounter on a walk. That mushroom does look like a hamburger bun!

Debbie said...

ooooh i just love that cute little honey stand. how could anyone not stop and get some. i think it would make a nice christmas gift also, with a nice package of gourmet crackers or bread!!

you picked the perfect spot for a picnic...i am curious about the wigwam??

your eye caught that single leaf and it made for a very beautiful image!!

photowannabe said...

Beautiful "travel guide" today. I love all the photos but especially the 2 red chairs...makes me want to sit down and enjoy the view.
The erosion is making fast work of the cliffs.
Thanks for sharing
Sue

Lorrie said...

Beautiful early autumn photos. I especially like the view of St. Dunstan's steeples, and it reminds me of our visit to Charlottetown a number of years ago. The erosion is continuous and sobering. What a lovely spot to have a picnic there by the wigwam.

gluten Free A_Z Blog said...

Maire,
I enjoyed following you along this trip. We also have a favorite place that we stock up on local honey. The erosion seems quite intense. I think I would be nervosa about eating mushrooms that I found.

At Home In New Zealand said...

Seeing your honey stall reminded me of a local hippie commune that used to sell their honey on the side of the road. We would always stop when we went past, but the whole lot is only a memory now. I miss their untreated raw honey :)

peppylady (Dora) said...

I find it interesting how the water cut into the land over they many years.
Coffee is on and stay safe

Liz Hinds said...

We saw some mushrooms in Italy. We were sure they were simply field mushrooms but still too scared to risk it!
Some of those cottages look a bit close to the encroaching sea. Beautiful area.

baili said...

it is joyous always to join you with your outing in island dear Marie :)

i think it is not safe to pick up mushrooms from the way .

water has eaten away a lot of land which makes cliffs very high ,i wonder if it is dangerous for the sustainability of whole island in far future ?

i liked the picnic pace